The Muddy Path

I’ve been wondering lately. How is it that I have been sloshing on this muddy path?  Almost everyday I wake up at 6am, and after my morning essentials I am off to the garden!  My forest/garden/orchard, “Isulawasi,” is named after a famous and plentiful insect, the giant bullet ant (Paraponera sp).  “Wasi” means house or place in Quechua.  So, to House of the “Isula” I go to work and play.

I arrived in Peru in the beginning of 2009.  I had recently been laid off from my position at the local watershed council and was up for a change. Given that I have roots in Peru, it seemed like the right choice coming over here to visit family, travel a bit, and contemplate my next move.  It did not occur to me at the time to live here, although I was open to the possibility and rather fed up with the political and economic situation back home.

View of Uchiza from Serra Campana

View of Uchiza from Serra Campana

My real adventures began when I arrived in Uchiza, a small town with a tainted history on the lower slopes of the tropical Andes. Little did I know what would wait in store.  Gradually, I left the big city comforts of Lima smitten with this small unpretentious jungle town.  As a matter of fact, by the time I had arrived in Uchiza, all the creature comforts i.e. internet, cable TV, cellphones had already been there for a few years!  So, I thought I would have the best of both worlds- rural tropical paradise AND civilization.

As I began to spend more time in Uchiza becoming familiar with my family roots and exploring the region, I began to think about how I could apply what I learned in my Permaculture design courses here.  Maybe, acquire a small piece of land and “develop” it in an ecologically “regenerative” way.  I knew that it would be difficult back home given my economic reality.

When the opportunity arose to purchase a rural property, I jumped on it.  First off, the price per hectare was unbelievably cheap.  The property itself was a bit remote and wild, but accessible (via trail) with several spring fed creeks, secondary, and primary forest near a small montane river.  More than half was suitable for small scale horticulture/agriculture and the rest for reforestation/ecological restoration.

Camote river

Camote river

I quickly closed the deal on 18 hectares, but had to settle without a land title for the time being.  In fact, few folks, I’d been told, possessed legitimate titles.  Also, most folks were waiting for the state to issue titles.  So, I had to wait and learn.  Patience became something to be practiced daily.

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